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II. The Place of God in Scientology Belief

The place of God in the beliefs of Scientology does not appear to be dominant, as it is in Christianity, Judaism and Islam, but it is clearly present. In the book The Scientology Religion, the chapter on Doctrine and Practice defines its mission as “to help the individual become aware of himself as an immortal being and to help himself achieve and attain the basic truths with regard to himself, his relationship to others ... and the Supreme Being”. Here and in the form of Customary Service it is stated that “we want to erase his sin so that he can be good enough to recognise God”, and “Man’s best evidence of God is the God that he finds within himself”. It is recognised that teaching about God within, and reincarnation, link Scientology to Eastern and Indian forms of religious thought. So it states the goal of “individual salvation in harmony with other life forms, the physical universe, and, ultimately, the Supreme Being. It is in this Eastern tradition that we find the background of Scientology”.

God is spoken of as the Eighth Dynamic, the highest level of reality which one attains when the Seventh Dynamic, the spiritual universe, is “reached in its entirety”. God and the spiritual universe is also “classified as theta universe”, and theta or thetan is described as “spirit” and the “person himself”.

God is spoken of as the Eighth Dynamic, the highest level of reality which one attains when the Seventh Dynamic, the spiritual universe, is “reached in its entirety”. God and the spiritual universe is also “classified as theta universe”, and theta or thetan is described as “spirit” and the “person himself”. There is a constant insistence on man as a spiritual entity, and rejection of materialistic explanations of human origins. Man is immortal, he has lived countless lives, and he can rise up to God. This is admittedly similar to some Indian religious beliefs and it is important in the claim of Scientology to be a religion.

III. Ceremonies and Their Meaning
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